Worldwide icon-chevron-right Where can you travel right now? Here are all the countries that have reopened

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Seychelles beach
Photograph: Shutterstock

Where can you travel right now? Here are all the countries that have reopened

Want to know where you can go on holiday? These are all the countries that have already reopened their borders – plus all those planning to soon

By Huw Oliver
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This year hasn’t gone quite to plan so far. We thought we were very much in the ‘de-escalation’ phase of lockdown, but for many of us, everything seems to be heading in the wrong direction once again. And yet, in many other countries, shops and restaurants are still very much open, internal travel has restarted, and politicians have already reopened borders in a bid to reboot their struggling tourism industries.

So the question is: when exactly will we be able to travel again? Well – for some of us at least – right now in fact. Governments across the world may still be advising their citizens to stay put, but many countries are still opening up in an effort draw visitors over the coming months.

Nations across the Mediterranean were among the first to welcome tourists again in May 2020, while destinations across the Caribbean and Asia also reopened borders, lifted travel restrictions and allowed commercial flights to resume at fuller service through the summer and autumn. In other words: we’re thrilled to say that sun-splashed getaway may well be on the cards sometime in 2021.

(Note that other destinations, including Bali and Australia, are yet to reopen at all, with the latter saying it might not welcome international visitors until the end of 2021.)

So, want to know where you can travel and go on holiday right now? Here’s the lowdown on all the countries that have already reopened – and all those are that are planning to soon.

Remember, many countries are still warning against all non-essential travel and some are quarantining all overseas arrivals, including their own returning citizens. Check all the relevant restrictions before you think about travelling.

Where can you travel right now?

Velebit mountain, Croatia, Zavizan
Velebit mountain, Croatia, Zavizan
Photograph: scimmery

Croatia

When did it reopen? May 9, 2020

Who’s allowed in? All travellers from within the EU and EEA, plus around a dozen other countries around the world. Arrivals from the UK and South Africa must self-quarantine for 14 days.

FYI: Visitors should provide an accommodation booking and fill out this form. They must also now provide a negative test result from within the past 48 hours.

8 Lisbon and Porto: Sintra
8 Lisbon and Porto: Sintra
Photograph: Shutterstock

Portugal

When did it reopen? May 22, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Visitors from EU and Schengen travel zone countries. Citizens and residents of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea and Thailand are also allowed in. British travellers are now banned (except for business or other ‘essential’ reasons).

FYI: Visitors to the Azores must bring a negative test result from within the past 72 hours, or take a test and wait 48 hours in self-isolation. Same goes for Madeira, but test results take 12 hours.

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Views over Vilnius (with hot air balloons) in Lithuania
Views over Vilnius (with hot air balloons) in Lithuania
Photograph: Shutterstock

Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania

When did they reopen? June 1, 2020

Who’s allowed in? All three countries have officially opened their borders to EU and Schengen-area nations, as well as a handful of other countries around the world. However, tourists coming from countries with high transmission rates will be asked to self-isolate for ten days.

FYI: The list of nationalities not subject to quarantine will be revised weekly. Estonia and Latvia are now asking passengers to show negative test results from within 72 hours of arrival.

Cyprus
Cyprus
Photograph: Shutterstock

Cyprus

When did it reopen? June 1, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Travellers from two sets of countries. Set A includes: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore and Thailand. Set B includes: China, Hong Kong, Finland, Germany, Greece, Japan and South Korea. Travellers from set B must provide a negative test result from within 72 hours of arrival.

FYI: The Cypriot government is reevaluating the two lists on a weekly basis.

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Ischia, Campania
Ischia, Campania
Photograph: Shutterstock

Italy

When did it reopen? June 3, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Travellers from EU countries and the Schengen travel zone. As of July 1, 2020, visitors from Canada, Japan and a handful of other countries outside Europe are also allowed in. Anyone arriving from another Schengen-area country will now have to provide a negative test result from within the past 48 hours. Arrivals from outside the Schengen area will have to self-isolate for 14 days. Flights from the UK and South Africa are suspended.

FYI: The EU is revising its list of ‘safe’ countries on a weekly basis.

Gros Piton in St Lucia
Gros Piton in St Lucia
Photograph: Shutterstock

St. Lucia and Antigua

When did they reopen? June 4, 2020

Who’s allowed in? All travellers.

FYI: You must present a negative test result from within seven days of arrival, and stay at an authorised hotel for at least the first 14 days.

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Zanzibar
Zanzibar
Photograph: Shutterstock

Zanzibar

When did it open? June 6, 2020

Who’s allowed in? All travellers.

FYI: The Tanzanian island says all visitors will be screened on arrival and only those who display symptoms will have to provide a recent negative test result. You must also hold valid health insurance.

 

Sibiu, Romania
Sibiu, Romania
Photograph: Shutterstock

Romania

When did it reopen? June 14, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Travellers from within the EU and Schengen travel zone, as well as those from around a dozen other countries around the world. Anyone travelling from a country on this ‘yellow list’, which currently includes the UK and US, will have to quarantine for 14 days.

FYI: This can be reduced to ten days, if you test negative on the eighth day of confinement. Note that the country is waiving all restrictions for travellers who have already received both doses of the vaccine.

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A harbour in Turkey
A harbour in Turkey
Photograph: Shutterstock

Turkey

When did it reopen? June 10, 2020

Who’s allowed in? The country has reopened the majority of its borders. It restarted international flights gradually last year – including to and from the USA, Italy, Sudan, the United Arab Emirates, Germany, Austria, Greece, Albania, Belarus, Jordan, Morocco, Latvia, Ireland, Slovakia and Belgium. Flights from the UK, Denmark and South Africa are currently suspended.

FYI: The country says more flight routes will reopen soon. All arrivals must provide a negative test result from within the past 72 hours.

Gdansk harbour
Gdansk harbour
Photograph: Shutterstock

Poland

When did it reopen? June 13, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Travellers from EU countries and the other nations in Europe’s passport-free Schengen area. Travel is currently restricted from a handful of European countries due to rising cases – and banned from the UK altogether. As of July 1, 2020, visitors from Canada, Georgia, Japan and South Korea are also allowed in (as recommended by the EU).

FYI: All travellers must provide a negative test result from within 48 hours of arrival. Europe is revising its list of ‘safe’ countries on a rolling weekly basis.

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Red Beach
Red Beach
Photograph: Shutterstock

Greece

When did it reopen? June 15, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Residents of EU and Schengen member states, plus the UK and around a dozen other countries around the world, can now get into the country. All travellers must test for Covid-19 on arrival and quarantine for 72 hours (and longer, if they test positive). Travellers from the UK must quarantine for ten days.

FYI: Visitors must also fill out a ‘passenger locator form’ at least 24 hours before arriving. This requires ‘detailed information on [passengers’] point of departure, the duration of previous stays in other countries, and the address of their stay while in Greece’. They may also face random testing.

Provence France
Provence France
Photograph: Shutterstock/prochasson frederic

France

When did it reopen? June 15, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Residents and citizens of EU member states or countries that fall in the free-movement Schengen area, plus the UK. France is also allowing in visitors from the EU’s ‘safe’ list of around a dozen other countries outside EuropeAs of December 20, only ‘essential’ travel is permitted from the UK.

FYI: All arrivals must now present a negative test result from within the past 72 hours. The EU is revising its list of ‘safe’ countries on a rolling weekly basis.

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JAMAICA
JAMAICA
Photograph: Shutterstock

Jamaica

When did it reopen? June 15, 2020

Who’s allowed in? All travellers (though flights from the UK are currently suspended).

FYI: Visitors will be tested for Covid-19 on arrival. They should also fill out this form before departure. Anyone arriving from certain ‘high-risk areas’ will have to provide a negative test result from within ten days of arrival.

A view over a coastal road in Iceland
A view over a coastal road in Iceland
Photograph: Shutterstock

Iceland

When did it reopen? June 15, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Visitors from the EU and Schengen travel area. From July 1, visitors from Australia, Canada, Japan and a handful of other countries outside Europe are also allowed in. UK travellers are currently banned.

FYI: You can avoid a two-week quarantine by being tested at the airport when you touch down. As of August 19, 2020, even if you test negative, you must then self-isolate for five days before taking a second test. As of December, if you can prove you’ve already had the virus (and recovered), then you can skip testing and quarantine.

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Amsterdam canal houses
Amsterdam canal houses
Photograph: Shutterstock

The Netherlands

When did it reopen? June 15, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Visitors from within the EU and Schengen area, plus a handful of other countries around the world. As of January 23, travel from the UK is banned.

FYI: All visitors must show a valid reservation when they arrive, and the authorities say you could be turned away if you have no pre-booked accommodation. You must also now provide a negative test result from within the past 72 hours.

Frigiliana, a village in Andalucia, Spain
Frigiliana, a village in Andalucia, Spain
Photograph: Botond Horvath / Shutterstock.com

Spain

When did it reopen? June 22, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Visitors from EU and Schengen member countries, plus around a dozen other countries around the world. Travel from the UK is currently banned, except for returning citizens and residents.

FYI: Visitors will face no mandatory quarantine, but will have to go through three ‘health checkpoints’: an information form, a temperature check and a visual inspection. You must also provide a negative test result from within the past 72 hours.

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Tunisia
Tunisia
Photograph: Shutterstock

Tunisia

When did it reopen? June 27, 2020

Who’s allowed in? The country has restarted flights to and from a handful of less-affected countries. Flights from the UK, South Africa, the Netherlands and Denmark are currently suspended.

FYI: Travellers must fill in this online form in advance, and present a negative test result from within the past 72 hours on arrival. You must also quarantine at an approved location for 14 days.

Bahamas
Bahamas
Photograph: Shutterstock

The Bahamas

When did it reopen? July 1, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Those with private yachts and planes have been able to travel to the Bahamas as of June 15, 2020. All other travellers were allowed in from July 1.

FYI: Visitors must fill out an ‘electronic health visa’ before they arrive and provide a negative test result from within five days of arrival.

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Isla Saona, eitw
Isla Saona, eitw
Photograph: Shutterstock

Dominican Republic

When did it reopen? July 1, 2020

Who’s allowed in? The country says it has reopened its ‘land, air and sea borders’ to all travellers. Arrivals from the UK must now quarantine for seven days.

FYI: Flights in and out are still limited. All visitors have to fill out a ‘health declaration’ form in advance, and there will be temperature checks on arrival.

Valletta street
Valletta street
Photograph: Shutterstock

Malta

When did it reopen? July 1, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Residents and citizens of EU and Schengen-area countries will now be allowed in, along with travellers from Australia, Canada, Japan and around 15 other nations around the world. Travel from the UK is banned.

FYI: You can expect temperature checks on arrival. Anyone not on Malta’s ‘green list’ of countries must provide a negative test result from 72 hours of arrival.

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Egypt coastal resorts
Egypt coastal resorts
Photograph: Shutterstock

Egypt

When did it reopen? July 1, 2020

Who’s allowed in? EgyptAir has resumed flights to and from countries including the UK, the USA, the Netherlands, Germany, Turkey, Italy, the UAE and Canada. All passengers will have to present a negative test result from within the past 72 hours.

FYI: Only certain resort areas and associated airports have reopened. There will be health screenings on arrival. You may have to quarantine, depending on test results.

Stonehole Bay Beach, Bermuda
Stonehole Bay Beach, Bermuda
Photograph: Courtesy Bermuda Tourism Authority

Bermuda

When did it reopen? July 1, 2020

Who’s allowed in? The British overseas territory has reopened to all international air travel.

FYI: Visitors are required to show a negative test result from within five days of arrival, and you should bring appropriate health insurance. British travellers must also quarantine for four days on arrival.

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Dubai Landscape
Dubai Landscape
Photograph: Imthiyas Khan, Shutterstock

Dubai

When did it reopen? July 7, 2020

Who’s allowed in? There aren’t any restrictions on where you can travel from.

FYI: All international visitors must present a negative test result from within 96 hours of arrival, or undergo testing at the airport. You must also bring valid health insurance.

Barbados
Barbados
Photograph: Shutterstock

Barbados

When did it reopen? July 12, 2020

Who’s allowed in? All travellers. Note that you’ll have to present a negative test result from within the past 72 hours – or get tested – on arrival. Anyone arriving from a ‘high-risk’ country will also have to quarantine for seven days at a hotel at their own expense, before taking another test.

FYI: If you don’t bring a test result, you’ll have to pay $150 for a test on arrival (and self-isolate for 48 hours while awaiting the results).

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Maldives
Maldives
Photograph: Shutterstock

The Maldives

When did it reopen? July 15, 2020

Who’s allowed in? All international travellers.

FYI: There are no quarantine requirements, except for British travellers, who are required to self-isolate for ten days. Tourists must, however, stay on designated ‘resort islands’ and book their entire stay at one establishment. There are exemptions only for transit to and from your accommodation. All arrivals must also provide a negative test result from within the past four days.

Turks and Caicos
Turks and Caicos
Photograph: Shutterstock

Turks and Caicos

When did it reopen? July 22, 2020

Who’s allowed in? All travellers.

FYI: Airlines across Europe and North America have restarted routes to the British overseas territory. All visitors must bring a negative test result from within five days of arrival.

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Tbilisi, Georgia
Tbilisi, Georgia
Photograph: Shutterstock

Georgia

When did it reopen? July 31, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Travellers from France, Germany, Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia.

FYI: You must fill out this form before leaving.

Seychelles beach
Seychelles beach
Photograph: Shutterstock

Seychelles

When did it reopen? August 1, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Visitors from countries classified as ‘category 1’ or ‘category 2’. Travellers from ‘category 1’ countries must submit a negative test result from within 72 hours of arrival, and won’t have to quarantine; those from ‘category 2’ nations must provide a negative test result from within 48 hours, and take a second test on the sixth day of their visit. They will also have to stay in approved accommodation for six days. UK travellers are now banned. The country has also said that anyone who’s had both doses of the vaccine can now enter without any restrictions.

FYI: The country is reevaluating these lists on a rolling weekly basis.

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Costa Rica's Cloud Forest
Costa Rica's Cloud Forest
Photograph: Shutterstock

Costa Rica

When did it reopen? August 1, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Air travel is now permitted from all countries.

FYI: Before entering the country, you’ll have to fill out this form.

Kenya
Kenya
Photograph: Shutterstock

Kenya

When did it reopen? August 1, 2020

Who’s allowed in? All travellers.

FYI: Tourists will have to bring a negative PCR test result from within the past four days, while ‘passenger locator cards’ will be used to trace all travellers entering the country in the event of an outbreak. There will also be temperature checks at the airport.

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Petra in Jordan
Petra in Jordan
Photograph: Shutterstock

Jordan

When did it reopen? September 10, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Visitors from around 40 countries, rated either red, yellow or green. Flights from the UK have been suspended.

FYI: Travellers from ‘green’ and ‘yellow’ countries will have to self-isolate for seven days on arrival. Those coming from ‘red’ countries will have to quarantine for 14 days. All arrivals must apply for a ‘travel pass’ before departure, and provide a negative test result from within 72 hours of arrival. Travellers will also have to take a second test, at their own expense, once they land.

Columbia, Botoga
Columbia, Botoga
Photograph: Shutterstock

Colombia

When did it reopen? September 21, 2020

Who’s allowed in? All nationalities. Flights to and from the UK have been suspended.

FYI: Make sure to fill out this ‘Check-Mig’ form. All travellers must also provide a negative test from within 96 hours of arrival.

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South Africa
South Africa
Photograph: Shutterstock

South Africa

When did it reopen? October 1, 2020

Who’s allowed in? All travellers.

FYI: All new arrivals in South Africa will be required to provide a negative Covid-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure or face quarantine on arrival. Visitors will additionally be screened for symptoms and required to register with South Africa’s contact tracing app.

A beach in Thailand
A beach in Thailand
Photograph: Wallpaperflare

Thailand

When did it reopen? October 1, 2020

Who’s allowed in? Travellers from anywhere in the world can now apply for a 60-day Thai visa, while those from ‘low-risk’ countries can apply for a ‘long stay’ of 90 days (which could then be extended for up to nine months).

FYI: All travellers must provide a negative test result from within the past 72 hours on arrival, then take a second test at the airport. They will also have to quarantine at government-approved accommodation for 14 days.

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Landscape in Chile
Landscape in Chile
Photograph: Shutterstock

Chile

When did it reopen? November 23, 2020

Who’s allowed in? All travellers (though flights from the UK have now been suspended).

FYI: Visitors will have to provide a negative PCR test result from within the past 72 hours. To start with, only Arturo Merino Benítez Airport in Santiago will be open.

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Photograph: Shutterstock

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